Stuff You Missed in History Class

by iHeartRadio · · · · 624 subscribers

Join Holly and Tracy as they bring you the greatest and strangest Stuff You Missed In History Class in this podcast by iHeartRadio.

James Baldwin June 17, 2020
James Baldwin was a brilliant essayist, one of the chroniclers of the Civil Rights Movement, and a powerful voice against racism. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Holly chats with Sheffield Hale and Michael Rose of the Atlanta History Center about pandemic from the point of view of a living history institution, and also how the AHC, like many history centers, is documenting Covid-19. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This 2015 episode covers a black U.S. Army WWI unit that became one of the most decorated of the war. When these soldiers returned home, they were greeted as heroes, but were still targets of segregation, discrimination and oppression. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Tracy and Holly talk about the unique identity of the Public Universal Friend, as well as whether Wat Tyler's story inspired modern storytellers. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
There were many transitional events between the the Black Death and the Renaissance; it wasn't a case of a one leading right to the other. One of those transition events was Wat Tyler’s Rebellion, also known as the Uprising of 1381 or the Great Rising. Learn more about your ad-choices …
The Public Universal Friend described themself as a genderless spirit sent by God to inhabit the resurrected body of a woman named Jemima Wilkinson. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This 2018 episode connects to a lot of others in our archive. Ida B. Wells- Barnett fought against lynching for decades, at a time when it wasn't common at all for a woman, especially a woman of color, to become such a prominent journalist and a speaker. Learn more about …
Holly and Tracy talk about the evolution of Monterey's Cannery Row and the history behind the fictional podcast Tumanbay. Their discussion then turns to current events, the death of George Floyd and the protests around the nation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast- advertisers
First, a brief discussion of current events. Then, in a conversation recorded in mid-May, Holly speaks with the creator of the historical fiction podcast Tumanbay about the ways that researching the Mamluk culture shaped the show. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast- advertisers
Cannery Row June 1, 2020
Monterey's Cannery Row is a busy center of tourism, but the area's history starts with indigenous people. Its association with fishing came from immigrant populations, and its reputation as a cannery exploded as that business was imploding. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This 2014 episode covers the 250,000 children in the U.S. taken to new families by train from 1854 and 1929, about. Except ... they weren't called "orphan trains" at the time, the children weren't all orphans, and "family" didn't always factor into it. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Tracy and Holly talk about their experiences with home economics in school, and discuss theories about childcare as it relates to practice baby programs. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast- advertisers
The Practice Babies May 27, 2020
Practice babies were live human babies, cared for by college seniors who were temporarily living in home ec practice houses. The babies mostly came from orphanages or child welfare agencies, and were usually adopted after their time in the program. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
For a time, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had a whole bureau of home economics, which was run by and for women, and was a huge part of the response to crises like the Great Depression and World War II. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
A 2013 episode about Phineas Gage, who experienced a catastrophic brain injury and survived - though altered - for more than 11 years. Over time, he became one of the world's most famous case studies in how damage to the brain can affect behavior. Learn more about your ad-choices at …
Holly and Tracy ponder the psychology of a lifetime of deception, and discuss the complex nature of the Boers' position in their conflict with Great Britain. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast- advertisers
After Duquesne made it to the U.S., he started a whole new life for himself, and worked for the rest of his life as a journalist, saboteur and spy. But eventually, all those lies caught up to him. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Duquesne changed his life story to suit his needs, worked under an estimated 40 aliases, and lived a life that directly involves a LOT of significant historical events. One of the things Duquesne excelled at was escaping custody. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast- advertisers
Dipping back to a 2015 episode. Despite all the fun cartoons on the packaging featuring tiny humanoid sea creatures having wacky fun and wearing clothes, Sea Monkeys are just brine shrimp. But the story of Sea Monkeys and their inventor is actually pretty surprising -- and quite dark. Learn more …
Tracy and Holly talk about the charm of bees, and the strangely intriguing nature of Grover Cleveland's tumor surgery. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers